Ceiling Fan Dipswitches

If you’re having a problem with your ceiling fan remote, and you’ve read into what dipswitches are all about, then you’ve likely landed on this page. It is possible that your ceiling fan dipswitch is malfunctioning, or needs to be replaced. The first thing you need to understand about dipswitches with ceiling fans, is they are the programming between the remote and the receiver. Before even thinking about replacing dipswitch modules, you should ensure that they are set the same way on the remote as they are on the fan’s receiver module. The dip switch modules on either the receiver of the remote should be replaced as a very last resort.

Ceiling Fan Dip Switch
Here’s what a dip switch looks like. They’re quite inexpensive – you can find replacement dipswitches on amazon for as little as 5 or 6 dollars.

Dipswitch modules may require replacement when you notice that they are no longer connected properly. Dipswitch modules have leads, where they are generally soldered into the receiver and the remote. Unless they are loose, they should not need to be replaced. It’s going to be a rare situation when you need to replace the dipswitches. With all of that being said, to replace dipswitches you will need to know how to solder. Dipswitches are generally soldered into the circuit board, much the same way as transistors or capacitors. The dipswitch module in itself is very inexpensive, and it’s not that difficult to solder another one in, as long as you know how to solder, desolder and check connections when you’re done.

What if I don’t know how to solder – how do I replace the dip switch?

If you’re not sure how to solder, or never done it before, you may want to consider replacing other components instead. E.g the remote can simply be replaced, and then make sure the ceiling fan dipswitch in the new remote is setup the same way as the dipswitches inside of the fan/receiver. Remotes are generally not too expensive. The cost of the remote of course is going to outweigh the few dollars you’d pay for a dipswitch. Dipswitches may be $5 or so, while remotes can be anywhere from $10-$50. It’s up to you to decide what remote you want, but also to ensure that the remote you purchase is compatible with¬† your fan.

Harbor Breeze Remote Control Programming

When installing the remote control, be sure your fan is operated in high speed and light is on condition at the switch knob.

Dip Switch Programming

Programming a ceiling fan is not the same or even close to programming a remote control for the TV, or other appliances. For these instances, there are many buttons; there is a code entered to program the remote with the TV, with the cable box, etc. Remote controls for ceiling fans only have a few buttons. The difference is that dip switches are set to program the remote to the fan. This is a “physical” programming so to say, because there’s no codes or button combinations to enter. The dip switches can have 16 different possible combinations, as there’s 4 switches and 2 settings per dip switch – up or down. Therefore 4 to the power of 2, 16 possible combinations.

Ceiling Fan Dip Switch
Here’s what a dip switch looks like. You’d need a ball point pen or something similar in order to make the proper adjustments.

As long as the dip switches are set properly on the fan and the receiver, meaning that they’re the same on both, it’ll work. If the fan does not work, or there are other problems, try reading our troubleshooting guide for more information.

1. Setting the code on the remote

a) First thing is to remove the battery cover

b) Set the dip switches. When the remote comes from the factory, the dip switches will all be set to up. Don’t use it like this – you need to set your own pattern. The dip switches are also called “code switches” by some people but their correct term is dip switches. You can use any unique pattern you like but the more unique the setting or pattern, the less likely it is your fan will end up being controlled accidentally by someone with the same remote or similar remote (or even just a remote set to the same dip switch settings).

c) Put the battery cover back on.

d) The same code that was set on the remote, needs to be set on the receiver as well.

How to Oil a Harbor Breeze Ceiling Fan

Is your fan making rubbing or grinding noises? One idea may be to oil your ceiling fan. Usually, this is not required, but there is an easy way to check to see if your fan has an oil reservoir. If it does, your fan may need oiling as regular maintenance. We’ll walk you through checking for the oil reservoir here in this article. This article will show you how to oil a harbor breeze ceiling fan.

The oil reservoir hole is generally located on top of the motor, near the downrod. If your fan does have an oil reservoir, you will see a small hole labelled oil hole. If you’re not able to find it, it likely does not exist – in this case, your fan does not need oiling. Many of the newer fans on the market today actually don’t need oiling – so checking for the oil hole is a good idea for squeaky fans that made rubbing or grinding sounds.

If your Ceiling Fan has a Oil Reservoir Hole

If you are able to find a oil hole, then use a pipe cleaner and insert it into the hole. This will help test the fan’s oil level. If the pipe cleaner comes out with oil on it, then it does not need oil. If the pipe cleaner comes out and has no oil on it, or it’s a super small amount of oil, then it needs to have oil added. The type of oil to be added is non detergent electric motor oil. This works well for fans. You can also take a look at Hunter Oil for Fans. This oil is specially formulated to be used specifically with ceiling fans.

Harbor Breeze Ceiling Fan Oil Diagram
This diagram is a good depiction of how the oil level looks in your fan. The main question you need to ask is, does your ceiling fan have an oil hole. If it does, oiling the fan needs to be part of regular maintenance.

If you’re going to find your own ceiling fan oil, take a look first to see what the manual says that came with your fan. It may point out what kind of oil should be used with the fan. If not, then what you want is non detergent motor oil. Don’t use just any oil, as certain oils can light on fire. Electric motors could cause the oil to light. Look for a 10, 15 or 20 weight oil. Avoid using 3 in 1 oil, as this also has detergents in it.

Do not use WD 40 to oil the fan, as this is not a motor oil!

Antique Ceiling Fans & Oil Reservoir Holes

Antique fans are more likely to have oil reservoir holes. This is due to the age and the function of the fan. Newer fans generally don’t require oiling as much as an older vintage or antique fan. Again, the best way to verify is to look for an oil reservoir hole. If there is a reservoir hole, use the pipe cleaner method we mentioned to verify if the fan has sufficient oil. If the oil level is completely empty, you will want to fill it as soon as possible!

 

How to Replace Ceiling Fan Blades

Do you have warped ceiling fan blades on your ceiling fan?

If you’re not sure whether your blades are warped, or you need to troubleshoot blades before you’ve come to this conclusion, read our article on using a blade balancing kit to determine if your Harbor Breeze blades are warped or not. Blades can become warped over time simply due to dust buildup. You may ask really, just some dust? The answer is yes. Over time, that dust buildup eventually causes blades to come out of alignment with other blades and become warped.

If you need  to replace blades due to them being warped or other, this article will help you to replace blades as necessary.

There’s a few things you will need first:

  • Phillips screwdriver, or a battery powered drill works better to get the work done faster.
  • Replacement ceiling fan blades
  • You may need a ladder

We’ve broken down the steps in a numbered list below.

  1. Remove the light kit using a screwdriver or the battery powered screwdriver
  2. Remove the screws holding the kit to the fan
  3. After that, start removing the blades, by removing the screws holding the blades in place. In doing so, you will remove the blade arms that attach to the blades
  4. On the back side of the blades there are three screws. Remove those, and then get the new blade ready or blades.
  5. Put the screws back into the new blade in order to attach the blade arm to the new blades
  6. Ensure the screws are snug and secure
  7. With the fan blade or blades now put back together, re-attach them to the fan and re-attach the screws

And that’s it! Pretty easy, right?

Here’s a sweet video explaining how to replace the fan blades. The video should make this super easy!

Ceiling fan is making a clicking noise

Whether you do have a Harbor Breeze ceiling fan, or a fan from another manufacturer, it’s possible that your fan may be making clicking noises. It’s possible that the fan may make these noises on any speed setting, or even just particular speed settings.

Many site visitors immediately think it’s a problem with the motor – which is actually not the case. If you have a problem with the motor, you may see symptoms like the fan not turning properly. Loud clicking noises can be the result of a loose blade, loose screw or another component that is generating the noise when friction is applied (when the fan turns). Check for loose blades. Take a look for the screws, or set screws that hold the blades onto the blade arms. Are they all secured well?

Try wiggling blades to find which blade is loose. Once you have found a loose blade, check all the screws and mounting components attached to that blade to find the source of the problem.